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A MILLION-DINAR QUESTION: Can Cash Transfers Drive Economic Recovery in Conflict-Driven Crises?

Over the past twenty years, the use of cash transfers in development and humanitarian interventions has experienced exponential growth. Both evidence and ethics have contributed to its rise. Extensive research has demonstrated how cash transfers can serve as critical lifelines in both acute humanitarian emergencies and more stable development contexts, whilst also providing recipients with […]

CategoriesJob

Join Our Team: Staff Accountant (Denver)

Position: Staff Accountant Deadline to Apply: May 30, 2021 (11:55p MDT) Start Date: June 2021, Full-time Location:  Denver, Colorado Salary Range:  $50,000-$65,000   Description: Causal Design is seeking a Staff Accountant to undertake all aspects of financial management, including corporate accounting, financial reporting, budget and forecasts preparation, as well as oversight of internal control policies and procedures. […]

New USAID Policy on Cost-Analysis in Impact Evaluations

USAID released a revised version of its policy on designing and implementing development projects and activities, governed by ADS Chapter 201. This is one of the largest revisions of the ADS in recent years and it includes some significant changes to the way USAID plans to operate its Program Cycle. One single sentence, in particular, stood out to us: All impact evaluations must include a cost-analysis of the intervention or interventions being studied (ADS 201.3.6.4) Economist Kristen Schubert discusses the changes, implications, and challenges for implementing partners…

CategoriesCommunity

Causal Design Cofounder to appear on WeWork Panel for Data in Development

I’m really excited to be a part of the development community that uses WeWork for office space in the US. Next week, WeWork K Street (DC) and Cooper/Smith are hosting a panel discussion on data collection, analysis, and use in international development. The (large) panel includes staff from 8 different wework-based firms all working in data for development.

Come check out the panel, ask some hard questions, and enjoy the free drinks.

Grad Fellow Notes: Loops in STATA

This week’s blog will feature a set of Stata tricks we used to addresses a particular issue that we encountered in our dataset.  Many of the variables were in string form and were not useable for Stata analysis.  Furthermore, the values of the variables were not in the correct order for our purposes.  A couple of commands came in handy here.  Loops are useful for many different repetitive commands.  They allowed us to quickly recode the values of a set of variables that have similar categorical values and also enabled us to destring sets of variables, setting them to numeric values.  These numeric values were in turn reordered to fit a desired pattern.  Finally, the labels for the numeric values were recoded to appear as the original text instead of just “1, 2, 3, etc”.

CategoriesResearch

SEEP 2017: Creating Commercial Farmers

Building scalable and sustainable food systems presents many challenges along farming value chains – not least of which is the point where our small holder famers interact with agricultural inputs. For an isolated farmer with limited education, making wise choices about farming can be challenging, meaning that many farmers fall short of the mark when it comes to running successful commercial enterprises.

CategoriesUncategorized

Grad Fellow Notes: Creating Professional Tables with Latex and Stata

Many users of Stata looking to visualize statistics opt to output results into MS Excel via commands like -tabout-, -putexcel-, and -outreg-. While Excel offers an intuitive and comprehensive way to create summary tables, it lacks the professionalism of tables commonly found in published journal articles. These tables can be created using Latex, and fortunately, many Stata packages have Latex functionality. This article is a tutorial on how to use Stata’s -tabout- command to create publishable and client-ready tables in Latex. It assumes the reader has a good grasp of Stata and -tabout-, but no knowledge of Latex. The tutorial is not intended to teach general Latex, but only enough Latex to take advantage of Stata’s output commands.